Category Archives: Money

Managing Drug Costs

Managing Drug Costs

How can households meet the challenge?   

 

Provided by Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA

 

Are prescription drug costs burdening your finances? This problem is far too common today. Consider the price tag of some of the drugs used to treat arthritis, hepatitis C, cancer, and multiple sclerosis. A Kaiser Family Foundation study notes that the cost of medications such as Zytiga, Humira, Gleevec, and Revlimid may run anywhere from $4,000-12,000 a year. For the record, Medicare Part D’s catastrophic coverage threshold for prescription medications is currently $4,850 per year (up from $4,700 in 2015).1,2

How can a household try to manage drug costs? There are some approaches that may help.

Shop around & compare Part D plans annually. This year, the Part D recipients who were automatically re-enrolled in their plans faced monthly premiums averaging $41.46, a 13% rise from $36.38 in 2015. As you shop, keep in mind that plans with smaller premiums may have higher out-of-pocket costs. Some plans also limit monthly doses of certain drugs in their coverage, or request patients to try less costly drugs before branded drugs can be prescribed.3

Consider generics. Generic drugs represent nearly 90% of prescriptions written today and can cost 80-90% less than branded therapies. Sometimes generic alternatives are not available, but often they are.3

Stay within the plan network. If you do, you’ll discover that 85% of Part D plans offer preferred in-network pharmacies. If you go out of the network for non-preferred medications, your cost for those medications may rise. That said, shopping around at different pharmacies may yield some savings. Pharmacies located inside big-box retailers sometimes provide amazing savings on commonly prescribed medications.3

Ask a compounding pharmacy if it can make a medication for you. In such an instance, the savings could be substantial.

Ask your doctor if you can reduce your dose. If that is doable, it could mean monthly savings.

Use a pill cutter. Typically, you pay for drugs by the pill rather than the pill strength. A pill cutter (which you can usually pick up for less than $10) can be an avenue to savings. This is true for many prescription drugs.4

Try GoodRx. This app is free for your phone, and you can also visit GoodRx.com on your PC. GoodRx will give you a coupon so you can buy a prescription drug at the price it has negotiated with particular pharmacies in your area. In some cases, the discounts can be as large as 90%.4 

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) & Roth IRAs may also be useful. If you do not yet qualify for Medicare coverage, you may have the option to create an HSA, which must be used in conjunction with a high-deductible health plan (the current IRS definition of a high-deductible is $1,300 for individuals and $2,600 for families). In 2016, individuals can put up to $3,350 into an HSA, families up to $6,750; those 55 or older may make an extra $1,000 catch-up contribution to their accounts. HSAs are funded with pre-tax dollars, so the contributions reduce your taxable income. HSA funds may be partly or wholly invested, and they can be withdrawn tax-free as long as they pay for qualified medical expenses. Accumulated HSA funds may be withdrawn and spent for any purpose once the accountholder turns 65; although, withdrawals will be taxed as regular income at that point if not used to pay for qualified health care costs.5

IRS Publication 502 defines the cost of prescription drugs (and insulin) as a qualified medical expense. Qualified medical expenses also include lab fees and the costs of eyeglasses and contact lenses, psychiatric care, and drug and alcohol rehab programs.5,6

If you are already a Medicare recipient, one unheralded approach is to use Roth IRA funds to help meet drug costs. Roth IRA withdrawals are voluntary if you are the original owner of the IRA, and they may be made tax-free if you follow IRS rules. Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from traditional IRAs represent taxable income, and those RMDs could put you in a higher tax bracket and even prompt a Medicare surcharge.3   

Lastly, see your doctor on a regular basis. A routine checkup could alert you and your primary care physician to what could become a chronic ailment. If treated early, that ailment could possibly be allayed, even overcome. Undetected or untreated, it could result in a long-term health problem with long-run financial impact.

 

Terri Fassi may be reached at 970-416-0088 or terri@fassifinancialnetwork.com

 

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Citations.

1 – benefitspro.com/2015/12/09/seniors-face-enormous-out-of-pocket-prescription-c [12/9/15]

2 – medicare.gov/part-d/costs/catastrophic-coverage/drug-plan-catastrophic-coverage.html [8/8/16]

3 – fool.com/retirement/2016/08/07/7-strategies-to-lower-your-medicare-prescription-d.aspx [8/7/16]

4 – vitality101.com/health-a-z/8-ways-to-slash-the-price-of-your-meds [6/8/16]

5 – investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/010516/how-effectively-utilize-health-saving-accounts.asp [1/5/16]

6 – tinyurl.com/zr2fmo7 [8/8/16]

An Introduction to The Stock Market

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STOCK MARKET

What it is, how it works, and how to get started.

 

Provided by Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA

 

Confused or unsure? You’re not alone. It’s amazing to me how many adults, many of them college grads, know practically nothing about the stock market. Many schools simply don’t offer or don’t require the classes that cover it. If you’ve been holding off on investing because you simply didn’t know enough about it … that’s probably wise. But rather than delay any longer, here’s some information to get you started:

The nuts and bolts. Basically, if you own a stock, you own a part of a company. You’ve invested in that company. If the company does well, the value of your stock rises. If the company does poorly, the value of your stock falls. That is the stock market in the simplest terms.

The market. Think of it like a flea market. Rather than travel all over town, a flea market offers you a central location where buyers and sellers can meet up. The stock market isn’t all that different. Stock markets are simply gathering places for stock owners to buy and sell stock securities.

Exchanging? Trading? These are terms you hear frequently in regard to stocks, but they can be misleading … and perhaps this is one reason there is so much confusion. You’re not actually exchanging stocks, and you’re not really trading stocks. You are buying them or selling them.

How much does it cost to buy or sell a stock? Actually, there are two costs to consider … 1) The cost of the stock, and 2) the cost of the “trade”. The price of the stock varies hugely from company to company and can change from moment to moment, so that’s a question I can’t answer for you. But there’s also a fee to buy or sell a stock (or “share”). The amount of the fee depends on which stock brokerage you use. Generally these fees can range from under $10 to $20 or even up to $100 per “trade”. Keep in mind you will pay a fee when you buy your stock, and again when you sell it.

What is a brokerage? A broker is a conduit for the buying and selling of stocks. For example, let’s say you want to buy a stock that’s listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Well, that stock is bought and sold on the floor of the NYSE. So, unless you are authorized to trade at the exchange and want to travel to New York, you instead enlist the services of a broker to take care of your buying and selling for you. Brokerages pay fees to become members of a stock exchange and access the “floor” of an exchange for trading. They then buy and sell stocks on behalf of their clients.

So, how do you get started? There are all kinds of ways to get started and a myriad of brokerage choices, including discretionary dealing (where the brokerage chooses stocks on your behalf), advisory dealing (where the brokerage gives you advice, but leaves the decisions up to you), and execution-only brokerages (where you will be entirely self-directed). Most brokerages have a minimum deposit you must make to get started, so you’ll want to look into that as well. If you’re serious about investing and want to do it frequently and avidly, read up on the markets and consider taking a class to educate yourself.

Before you make any big decisions, though, think about enlisting the assistance of a qualified financial professional who can give you insight and perspective on the financial markets.

 

Terri Fassi may be reached at 970-416-0088 or terri@fassifinancialnetwork.com

 

These are the views of Peter Montoya, Inc., not the named Representative or Broker/Dealer, and should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representative or Broker/Dealer give tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information.

 

Saving Early & Letting Time Work For You

Saving Early & Letting Time Work for You

The earlier you start pursuing financial goals, the better your outcome may be.

 

Provided by Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA

 

As a young investor, you have a powerful ally on your side: time. When you start saving and investing for retirement in your twenties or thirties, you can put it to work for you. 

The effect of compounding is huge. Most people underestimate it, so it is worth illustrating. We will use reasonable annual return rates to do so – we will assume an investor can earn an average of 6-7% a year on his or her portfolio.

What if you invest $500 a month at age 25 & realize a 6% annual return? Under those hypothetical conditions, you would become a millionaire at age 65. To be precise, you would need to invest $499.64 per month starting at age 25 and keep it up for 40 years.1

At age 25, saving and investing $500 each month may seem like a luxury. It is closer to a necessity. In 2055, having $1 million or more saved up for retirement may be essential. Over 40 years, inflation will make $1 million worth less than it is today. The good news is that if your investments return more than 6% in a year, you could reach and surpass that $1 million mark faster.

It need not take 40 years for compounding to make a difference for you. Shortening the timeline of this hypothetical example, after ten years of saving and investing $500 a month at a 6% annual return, you would end up with $81,939.67 compared to the $60,000 you would realize from merely saving the cash sans investment.2

The earlier you start, the greater the compounding potential. If you start saving and investing for retirement in your twenties, you gain a definite compounding advantage over someone who waits to save and invest until his or her thirties. Another comparison bears this out.

Take two investors, both contributing $200 per month into their retirement accounts. One does this for 40 years starting at age 25. The other does this for 30 years starting at age 35. Again, we assume a 6% annual return for each account. The investor who starts at 25 winds up with $402,492 at age 65, while the one who started at 35 amasses just $203,118 over 30 years.3

Just ten years of difference in the start time, yet the money almost doubles by age 65. This is a compelling argument for starting to save for retirement (and other goals) as early as possible.

Even if you start early & then stop, you may out-save those who begin later. What if you contribute $5,000 to a retirement account yearly starting at age 25 and then stop at age 35 – no new money going into the account for the next 30 years? That is hardly ideal, yet should it happen, you still might come out ahead of someone who begins saving for retirement later.

As J.P. Morgan Asset Management research notes, an investor who consistently directs $5,000 a year in a retirement account from age 25-35 with a 7% continued annual return ends up with $602,070 at age 65 even if contributions cease after age 35. The really startling part: that investor actually amasses more retirement savings than an investor who steadily contributes $5,000 a year from age 35-65 at the same rate of return – he or she realizes just $540,741.1

This is all worth noting, because many millennials seem wary of investing. This spring, a Bankrate MoneyPulse survey indicated that only 26% of Americans under age 30 are investing in equities. In July 2014, another Bankrate survey found that Americans 18-29 favored cash investments (i.e., bank accounts and bank-based investment vehicles) above all others. Student loans and child-rearing costs reduce investing potential for many millennials, but as these survey results hint, some are cynical about the whole investment process.4,5

If you were born in the late eighties to early nineties, you are old enough to remember the dot-com bust of the early 2000s and the crushing bear market of 2007-09. This may have given you an early negative view of equities; these events are clear examples of how risk plays a part in this type of investment.

The reality, though, is that most people planning for retirement need to build wealth in a way that outpaces inflation. Equity investing offers a route toward this objective, one many investors have successfully taken. Directing your savings into equities can be helpful, because broadly speaking, you will not retire merely on the contributions you make to your retirement accounts. You will retire on the compounded earnings those invested assets achieve.

 

Terri Fassi may be reached at 970-416-0088 or terri@fassifinancialnetwork.com

 

 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

    

Citations.

1 – businessinsider.com/amazing-power-of-compound-interest-2014-7 [7/8/14]

2 – quickenloans.com/blog/investing-101-how-to-get-started [8/27/15]

3 – businessinsider.com/saving-at-25-vs-saving-at-35-2014-3 [3/25/14]

4 – cnbc.com/2015/08/24/more-millennials-say-no-to-stocks-and-advisors-adapt.html [8/24/15]

5 – bankrate.com/finance/consumer-index/financial-security-charts-0714.aspx [7/21/14]

 

Estate Planning vs Advanced Estate Planning

ESTATE PLANNING vs. ADVANCED ESTATE PLANNING

Who needs what? What’s the difference?

 

Provided by Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA

Everyone has an estate. Rich or poor, it doesn’t matter. When you die, you leave behind an estate. For some, this can mean property, cash money, assets and more. For others it could be as simple as the $10 bill in their wallet and the clothes on their back. Either way, what you leave behind when you die is considered to be your “estate”.

Why plan? Well, even if you’re just leaving behind the $10 bill in your wallet, who will inherit it? Do you have a spouse? Children? Is it theirs? Should it go to just one of them, or be split between them? This (quite simply) is what estate planning is all about. Estate planning determines how your money and assets (property – both real and personal) will be distributed after your lifetime.

Who needs estate planning? While it is absolutely possible to die without planning your estate, I wouldn’t say it is advisable. If you die without an estate plan, your family could face major legal issues and (possibly) bitter disputes. So in my opinion, everyone should do some form of estate planning. Your estate plan could include wills and trusts, life insurance, disability insurance, a living will, a pre- or post-nuptial agreement, long-term care insurance, power of attorney and more.

Why not just a will? Did you know that your heirs may need to file a petition to probate your estate … even if you have a will? Basically, a will tells the world what you’d like to have happen, but other items (like properly prepared and funded trusts) can provide the tools to make things happen, and help your heirs to avoid probate.

So, what is “advanced” estate planning? Advanced estate planning is generally something those with a very high net worth should consider. For example, if you are single and your net worth exceeds $1.5 million dollars, or if you are married and (as a couple) your net worth exceeds $3.5 million dollars, you should consider advanced estate planning. The main purpose of advanced estate planning is to reduce taxes. The use of unified credit, gifting strategies, trusts and more can help your heirs receive the highest benefits possible under federal and state laws.

Where do you begin? Whether you need basic or advanced estate planning, I would advise you to speak with qualified professionals. A Financial Advisor can refer you to a good estate planning attorney and a qualified tax professional, and lead a team effort to assist you in drafting your legal documents. Many financial professionals have relationships with attorneys and accountants, so the advisor you consult may be able to refer you to the right specialists.

 

Terri Fassi may be reached at 970-416-0088 or terri@fassifinancialnetwork.com

 

These are the views of Peter Montoya, Inc., not the named Representative or Broker/Dealer, and should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representative or Broker/Dealer give tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information.

 

* As of 2006

Bonds and Interest Rates

Bonds and Interest Rates

A look at how one can greatly affect the other.

 

Provided by Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA

 

Is the bond bull history? Bond titan Bill Gross called an end to the 30-year bull market in fixed income back in 2010, and he has repeated his opinion since. Legendary investor Jim Rogers predicted an end to the bond bull in 2009, and he still sees it happening. This belief is starting to become popular – the Federal Reserve keeps easing and more and more investors are leaving Treasuries for equities.1,2,3

If the long bull market in bonds has ended, the final phase was certainly impressive. During the four-year stretch after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, $900 billion flowed into bond funds and $410 billion left equities.2

In 2013, you have bulls running, an assumption that Fed money printing will start to subside and the real yield on the 10-year TIPS in negative territory. Assuming the economy continues to improve and appetite for risk stays strong, what will happen to bond investors when inflation and interest rates inevitably rise and bond market values fall?

Conditions hint at an oncoming bear market. When interest rates rise again, how many bond owners are going to hang on to their 10-year or 30-year Treasuries until maturity? Who will want a 1.5% or 2.5% return for a decade? Looking at composite bond rates over at Yahoo’s Bonds Center, even longer-term corporate bonds offered but a 3.5%-4.3% return in late March.4

What do you end up with when you sell a bond before its maturity? The market value. If the federal funds rate rises 3%, a longer-term Treasury might lose as much as a third of its market value as a consequence. It wasn’t that long ago – June 12, 2007, to be exact – when the yield on the 10-year note settled up at 5.26%.5

This risk aside, what if you want or need to stay in bonds? Some bond market analysts believe now might be a time to exploit short-term bonds with laddered maturity dates. What’s the trade-off in that move? Well, you are accepting lower interest rates in exchange for a potentially smaller drop in the market value of these securities if rates rise. If you are after higher rates of return from short-duration bonds, you may have to look to bonds that are investment-grade but without AAA or AA ratings.

If you see interest rates rising sooner rather than later, exploiting short maturities could position you to get your principal back in the short term. That could give you cash which you could reinvest in response to climbing interest rates. If you think bond owners are in for some pain in the coming years, you could limit yourself to small positions in bonds.

The Treasury needs revenue and senses the plight of certain bond owners, and in response, it has plans to roll out floating-rate notes by 2014. A floater backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government would have real appeal – its yield could be adjusted per movements in a base interest rate (yet to be selected by the Treasury), and you could hold onto it for a while instead of getting in and out of various short-term debt instruments and incurring the related transaction costs.6

Appetite for risk may displace anxiety faster than we think. In this bull market, why would people put their money into an investment offering a 1.5% return for 10 years? Portfolio diversification aside, a major reason is fear – the fear of volatility and a global downturn. That fear prompts many investors to play “not to lose” – but should interest rates rise significantly in the next few years, owners of long-term bonds might find themselves losing out in terms of their portfolio’s potential.

Terri Fassi may be reached at 970-416-0088 or terri@fassifinancialnetwork.com

 

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Citations.

1 – www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-10-27/fed-easing-likely-to-mark-end-of-30-year-bull-market-for-bonds-gross-says.html [10/27/10]

2 – online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390443884104577645470279806022.html [9/15/12]

3 – www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-07/u-s-30-year-bond-losses-pass-5-as-fed-price-gauge-rises.html [2/7/13]

4 – finance.yahoo.com/bonds/composite_bond_rates [3/27/13]

5 – www.treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yieldYear&year=2007 [2/6/13]

6 – online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324590904578287802587652738.html [2/6/13]

 

Using Debit vs. Using Credit

Using Debit vs. Using Credit

How preferable is one type of plastic to another?

Provided by Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA

 

You’re about to purchase a pricy good or service and you don’t have your checkbook or enough cash on hand to do it. Should you pull out a debit card, or a credit card?

Given the choice, you’d probably pick a debit card – right? After all, aren’t they preferable to credit cards? Usually, yes – but not always.

How debit cards actually work. Debit cards pull money straight from your bank account. What if you have insufficient funds in your account? If that happens, the bank can decide to do one of two things, per the terms of the particular debit card – it can elect to decline the charge, or shoulder the cost of the transaction and ding you for insufficient funds. Some banks give you overdraft protection for recurring debit card charges, but not for one-time transactions.1,2

Your debit card may bear a VISA or MasterCard logo. If that is the case, you have the option to use it as a credit card. If you choose that option, your transaction is then handled by the credit card firm rather than the bank, and the money may not be taken out of your account immediately as some retailers wait until the end of their business day to notify credit card companies of transactions.3

How credit cards actually work. A credit card purchase is processed in four phases. First, you authorize a purchase with your signature. Next, the purchase is compiled with other credit card charges into a “batch”, which the merchant may wait until the end of the day to send. The batch is sooner or later sent to the card issuers, thereby requesting payments. Finally, the merchant gets the payments minus discount and interchange fees along the way.3

The small businesses you frequent likely prefer debit to credit. Debit card transactions come with lower transaction fees than those of their plastic cousins. A debit card purchase is not a cash sale, but it is remarkably close to one. Due to the larger transaction fees associated with credit transactions, some stores bar the use of a credit card for very small purchases – in those cases, it isn’t worth the trouble for the retailer.

Banks charge merchants fees for the privilege of accepting debit cards, and retailers are hailing a July U.S. District Court ruling calling for lower caps on those fees. This summer, U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon tossed out the current Federal Reserve cap of $0.21 in interchange fees per debit card swipe as too excessive. The Fed will likely appeal the ruling well into 2014.4

Debit cards may offer less fraud protection, however. Here is an area where credit cards look good in comparison. While a straight-up debit card payment is instantly deducted from your bank account, you ultimately pay credit charge charges only if you agree to the legitimacy of the charge and the delivery of the product or service. Translation: a credit card offers you a kind of signatory “firewall” against fraud (at least at the point of purchase). Your liability for fraudulent credit charges is capped at a certain level; fraudulently debited charges can be another story. Disputed charges on credit cards are often handled faster as well.5,6

Also, there are some situations where it is pretty hard to get by with just a debit card. If you want to rent a car or reserve a nice hotel room, a credit card is all but essential. You also build credit history through credit card use, not debit card use.5

Both kinds of cards are susceptible to “gray” charges. Tiny little monthly membership charges, small levies for “phantom” (additional) products or services sold to you at the point of sale, “zombie” charges for an ongoing subscription you don’t formally cancel – they are some of the “gray” charges that may come your way with both kinds of cards, and they are entirely legal. Retailers bury them in the fine print, and made an extra $14.3 billion of cardholders this way in 2012.7

Debit is usually preferable to credit, but cash is still king. Sensible use of debit and credit cards can help you build your credit history and perhaps make things a little easier for you as a consumer. Runaway use of them may bring problems. Credit and debit cards are ultimately conveniences, and not replacements for cash.

Terri Fassi, CPA, MBA, CDFA  is a Representative with Centaurus Financial Inc. and may be reached at Fassi Financial, 970-416-0088 or terri@fassifinancialnetwork.com.

This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Citations.

1 – consumerreports.org/cro/news/2013/06/debit-card-overdrafts-can-cost-you-big-bucks/index.htm / [6/14/13]

2 – mainstreet.com/article/money/investing/how-i-got-hit-overdraft-fee-after-opting-out-overdraft-protection [3/21/12]

3 – creditcards.com/credit-card-news/how-a-credit-card-is-processed-1275.php [1/14/09]

4 – online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324635904578639833002818450.html [7/31/13]

5 – cbsnews.com/8301-505146_162-57365965/4-reasons-to-use-credit-cards-versus-debit-cards/ [1/26/12]

6 – kiplinger.com/article/credit/T016-C000-S002-battle-royal-credit-vs-debit.html [4/10]

7 – dallasnews.com/business/columnists/pamela-yip/20130818-pamela-yip-gray-charges-on-credit-and-debit-cards-can-put-you-in-the-red.ece [8/18/13]